About real ravens

Other birds seems to just eat the same old food and sing the same old songs depending on how hungry, scared or lonely they feel. But the raven can talk with different intonation and sounds and if he is up for it he can fly upside down. He is not fuzzy about his food; road kill is just as fine as garbage or blueberries. He doesn´t seem to care much about where in the world he lives. Ravens are found in deserts, in the arctic, in forests and by the sea. In contrast to other more boring birds the ravens seems to enjoy themselves and are often seen playing funny games, very often by annoying other animals. They are bold enough to grab a feather from an eagle or pulling the tail of a wolf. If you get lucky you might see a raven crash dive with closed wings or make perfect somersaults and other skilled tricks. Their varied language strengthens their parent´s unity that can last all their lives. The raven gives his partner small presents, small pieces of nice moss or especially pretty stones. It even looks like they kiss each other sometimes. When mating you can hear a specific bubbling sound, it may sound just like when you open a bottle of champagne.  They have so many different sounds. When a male raven calls his female he makes a sound that only she can recognize and respond to. She has a name, thus. In myths of raven he is often seen shifting his form, he can transform himself to just anything. Also in reality they are masters of changing their appearance. They can, if they want to, raise their head feathers so they appear to have their feathers parted in the middle. A scientist once made the experiment of hanging a piece of meat from a long string. To reach the meat the raven had to bring up the string bit by bit and at the same time keep the loose string with one foot every time he took a new grip. To make this work you have to be extremely smart. Many ravens succeed surprisingly well. The raven specialists (oh, what a wonderful job) say it is the playfulness that is the key to their intelligence.

17. May 2012 by Teresa
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